Volume 5, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 6-12
Comparative Determination of Levels of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) at Some Selected Flow Stations in Delta State, Nigeria
Onwukeme Valentine Ifenna, Deparment of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria
Etienajirhevwe Omonigho Frank, Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Delta State Polytechnic, Otefe, Oghara, Nigeria
Received: Apr. 21, 2020;       Accepted: May 11, 2020;       Published: Jun. 3, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.wjac.20200501.12      View  333      Downloads  76
Abstract
Twelve air samples were collected from four sampling locations namely Transcorp Power Station, Warri Refinery and Petrochemical Company, Amukpe Flow Station and Platform Petroleum Company and were analyzed for the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Triplicate samplings were carried out within three months for fourteen days using the passive method. After collection, digestion and extraction, VOCs concentrations in each sample were determined with Gas Chromatography equipped with Mass Spectrophotometer (GC/MS). Mean results of analysis showed VOCs in the range of 1.21 - 60.30, 9.12 – 30.80, 5.38 – 66.94 and 7.22 – 101.30µg/m3 for Transcorp Power Station, Warri Refinery and Petrochemical Company, Amukpe Flow Station and Platform Petroleum Company respectively. Results obtained found all the study location to be contaminated with VOCs when compared with critical values for air quality guidelines. It was therefore recommended that as individuals, we should consider the consequences of our actions and work to improve the quality of air for future generation.
Keywords
Volatile Organic Compounds, Glass Tube, Concentration, Pollution, Contamination
To cite this article
Onwukeme Valentine Ifenna, Etienajirhevwe Omonigho Frank, Comparative Determination of Levels of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) at Some Selected Flow Stations in Delta State, Nigeria, World Journal of Applied Chemistry. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2020, pp. 6-12. doi: 10.11648/j.wjac.20200501.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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